Horribly Bookish

For the endlessly inspiring written word and appreciation of all things bookish

You think ‘Okay, I get it, I’m prepared for the worst’, but you hold out that small hope, see, and that’s what fucks you up. That’s what kills you.

—Stephen King. “Joyland”. (via stymshaw)

(Source: fuckyeah-unclesteve, via mydraco)

Here’s what our parents never taught us:

You will stay up on your rooftop until sunlight peels away the husk of the moon,
chainsmoking cigarettes and reading Baudelaire, and
you will learn that you only ever want to fall in love with someone
who will stay up to watch the sun rise with you.

You will fall in love with train rides, and sooner or later you will
realize that nowhere seems like home anymore.

A woman will kiss you and you’ll think her lips are two petals
rubbing against your mouth.

You will not tell anyone that you liked it.
It’s okay.
It is beautiful to love humans in a world where love is a metaphor for lust.

You can leave if you want, with only your skin as a carry-on.

All you need is a twenty in your pocket and a bus ticket.
All you need is someone on the other end of the map, thinking about the supple
curves of your body, to guide you to a home that stretches out for miles
and miles on end.

You will lie to everyone you love.
They will love you anyways.

One day you’ll wake up and realize that you are too big for your own skin.

Molt.
Don’t be afraid.

Your body is a house where the shutters blow in and out
against the windowpane.

You are a hurricane-prone area.
The glass will break through often.

But it’s okay. I promise.

Remember,
a stranger once told you that the breeze
here is something worth writing poems about.

—“Here’s What Our Parents Never Taught Us,” Shinji Moon  (via hurrl-scout)

(Source: commovente, via nerdfighterlike)

Writer Beware

the-right-writing:

the-right-writing:

Writer Beware makes posts on which publishing houses to avoid at all costs, which words to look for and which words to watch out for in contracts, and several other things that will keep you in control and knowledgeable about the publishing process.  I’d suggest reading through the website if you want to avoid getting ripped off, cheated, or scammed.

I’m just going to reblog this every so often because it’s a site that every writer needs to see.

(via theroadpavedwithwords)

WHO WROTE WHAT BIT?
Ah. Another tricky one. As the official Keeper of the One True Copy, Terry physically wrote more of Draft 1 than Neil. But if 2,000 words are written down after a lot of excited shouting, it’s a moot point whose words they are. And, in any case, as a matter of honor both of them rewrote and footnoted the other guy’s stuff, and both can write passably in the other guy’s style. The Agnes Nutter scenes and the kids mostly originated with Terry, the Four Horsemen and anything with maggots started with Neil. Neil had the most influence on the opening, Terry on the ending. Apart from that, they just shouted excitedly a lot.

The point they both realised the text had wandered into its own world was in the basement of the old Gollancz books, where they’d got together to proofread the final copy, and Neil congratulated Terry on a line that Terry knew he hadn’t written, and Neil was certain that he hadn’t written either. They both privately suspect that at some point the book had started to generate text on its own, but neither of them will actually admit this publicly for fear of being thought odd.

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (2006 edition) - appendix by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

(Source: hapfairy)

People run from rain but
sit
in bathtubs full of
water.

Charles Bukowski (via bittersweetsongs)

Wow bukowski so profound do you also bathe fully clothed you dickhead. “Oohh isn’t it funny that a person will eat when they’re hungry but will duck if you throw an apple at their face”

(via coolestpriest)

(Source: cachaemic, via holy-super-who-lock)

youruffledmyruffalo:

once upon a time, i was in an honors english class as a sophomore in high school, and we covered the great gatsby

and once a day, every day, one young man would say, in the exact same inquisitive tone of wonder,

"wait a minute! is nick gay for gatsby?"

until finally, one day, our teacher shouted, “YES NICK IS GAY FOR GATSBY BUT I CAN’T TEACH YOU THAT BECAUSE THIS IS A CATHOLIC SCHOOL.” 

(Source: rainwateralpha, via ashleysavalanche)

thedsgnblog:

Sherpa    |    http://sherpa-design.de

"A Clockwork Orange broaches the issue of the freedom of the individual by using the protagonist Alex. The recipient accompanies Alex through the plot and takes his point of view. He senses whenever Alex acts in a state of free will and he senses whenever Alexs free will is limited. Furthermore in some passages he takes a point of view above Alex as a spectator.

The notices being made in this position are arranged in a subtle visual and typographical staging. The recipient is being tricked. He thinks to be in full control about his way of reading. In fact the typographical staging has control about the recipient and guides him in one’s sole discretion.”

Sherpa focuses on the development, optimization and management of brands in various disciplines such as Corporate Design and Publishing as well as Digital Branding.

The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

(via msaether)

Instagram